Insomnia Treatment

The Evolution Of Insomnia Treatment

When it comes to the treatment of insomnia, the conventional approach has typically involved medication and behavioural therapy. However, as with any health condition, there is often more to the story than what is initially presented. Insomnia is a complex disorder that can be influenced by a wide range of factors, including lifestyle habits, underlying medical conditions, and psychological factors.

As such, there is a growing awareness of the need to explore alternative treatment options for insomnia that go beyond the mainstream approaches. While medication and behavioural therapy can certainly be effective for some individuals, they may not work for everyone, and may not address the root causes of insomnia.

Research is continually uncovering new insights into the underlying mechanisms of insomnia, as well as potential therapies that can help to alleviate its symptoms. These may include innovative techniques such as cognitive-behavioural therapy for insomnia (CBT-I), mindfulness-based approaches, and alternative treatments like acupuncture or herbal remedies.

While mainstream treatments for insomnia have an important role to play in managing this common sleep disorder, it is important to recognise that there is a whole world of possibilities beyond the conventional approach. By staying informed and exploring different treatment options, individuals with insomnia may be able to find a more personalised and effective path to improved sleep and overall well-being.

The Evolution Of Insomnia Treatment

As our understanding of insomnia has evolved, so has our treatment approach. In the early days, behavioural therapy was the primary treatment option, focusing on teaching patients good sleep hygiene habits and relaxation techniques to promote better sleep. While this approach could be effective, it was not always sufficient for those with more severe insomnia.

As prescription sleep medications such as barbiturates and benzodiazepines were developed, they became a popular treatment option. These medications were effective but had a high risk of dependence and other side effects. As such, non-benzodiazepine sedatives were developed in the 1990s, such as zolpidem (Ambien) and eszopiclone (Lunesta). These medications effectively promote sleep with a lower risk of dependence and side effects.

However, in recent years, cognitive-behavioural therapy for insomnia (CBT-I) has emerged as a highly effective treatment option. CBT-I focuses on changing the thoughts and behaviours contributing to insomnia rather than relying on medication. This approach has been shown to be as effective as medication for many people, with the added benefit of avoiding the potential for dependence and side effects.

Additionally, there are several alternative therapies that can be helpful for insomnia, such as acupuncture, herbal remedies, and mindfulness meditation. While more research is needed to fully understand the effectiveness of these treatments, they can be a useful addition to a comprehensive insomnia treatment plan.

Overall, the evolution of insomnia treatment reflects a move towards more personalized and comprehensive approaches to care. By addressing the underlying causes of insomnia and tailoring treatment to each individual, we can help more people achieve restful, restorative sleep and improve their overall health and well-being.

Insomnia Treatments And Therapies

Mindfulness-Based Cognitive Therapy (MBCT)

Cognitive Behavioural Therapy for insomnia (CBT-i)

Float Tanks

Float Tanks

Brain chemistry

Brainwave Entrainment

Cognitive behavioral therapy for insomnia is a structured program that helps you to overcome the underlying causes of your sleep problems. The programme allows you to identify and replace thoughts and behaviours that cause or worsen sleep problems with habits that promote sound sleep.

Floating is a more recent addition to the wellness therapy landscape, becoming hugely popular in the past decade. Although float tanks won’t directly reduce Insomnia symptoms, they are known for supporting the reduction of stress and improving mental and emotional issues, which itself can prepare your body for a better night’s sleep. Float tanks are pods that act like sensory deprivation chambers, increasing your ability to relax and ‘switch off’. As the name suggests, you float, in body-temperature water, with low or no light.

Brainwave Entrainment is a form of light therapy that aims to reduce mental and emotional stress through changes in the frequency of brainwaves. In the same way that medication seeks to alter brain chemistry, brainwave entrainment seeks to alter brainwave activity.

The cognitive part of CBT-I teaches you to recognise and change beliefs that affect your ability to sleep—helping you to control or eliminate negative thoughts and worries that keep you awake. The behavioral part of CBT-I helps you develop good sleep habits and avoid behaviors that keep you from sleeping well.

Depending on your needs, your sleep therapist may recommend some or a combination of these CBT-I techniques:

  • Stimulus control therapy 
  • Sleep restriction
  • Sleep hygiene
  • Sleep environment improvement
  • Relaxation training 
  • Remaining passively awake 
  • Biofeedback

Float tank therapy research shows promising results in reducing blood pressure and blood cortisol levels, improving recovery after sports and other physiological improvements. It’s also been shown to help manage anxiety symptoms and can even be useful in dealing with addiction. Shutting down the sensory input to the brain for an hour enables improvement in output and functionality. Simply put, it may be that floating is beneficial because we are so over-stimulated; and that just by resting our brains, it is able to perform better in ways that can even help mental health.

When neurophysiology researchers scan the brains of Buddhist monks, they see consistently different brainwave patterns than they do when they scan the brain of stressed-out executives. This is because the brain is primarily an electric organ whose fundamental output can be measured in terms of its bioelectric output.

By stimulating brain cells with light that matches the frequency of happy, relaxed brain waves, entrainment aims to alter mood and mental function in people suffering from trauma & PTSD symptoms. Many trauma & PTSD  sufferers report dramatic alterations in their mood and mental function after even a handful of Brainwave Entrainment sessions. 

Brainwave Entrainment still sits very much on the margins of popular and well-known care options for trauma & PTSD  symptoms. In much the same way that EMDR Therapy did a short time ago. It should be interesting to see where Brainwave Entrainment research leads in years to come.

Trauma Release Exercises (TRE)

Trauma Release Exercises (TRE)

Deepwave - OCD, Insomnia, sleep insomnia reading book

Sleep Schedule

Exercise

Exercise

Trauma-release exercises tap into the body’s ability to release old stress responses from muscle tissue. This can sound a little strange until it’s explained properly. We are learning that much of our trauma and stress are actually stored in the body, as opposed to just the brain. This is where trauma and stress-release exercises come in.

A consistent sleep schedule helps to maintain the body’s internal clock or circadian rhythm. Creating a solid sleep schedule invites better quality rest, which then leads to better overall health. Ensure consistency, even at weekends, with the times you wake and head off to bed.

Regular exercise can improve or deepen sleep in adults regardless of a sleep disorder. There are a few reasons why exercise can help; firstly, exercise is a wonderful way to reduce stress and anxiety levels through the release of endorphins. This aids in relaxing and minimizing the tossing and turning you might experience when you try to sleep.

Think of the way chronic stress can lead to a build-up of muscle tension over time. In the sense we often notice if we are receiving a shoulder massage. That tension actually builds up through countless unprocessed fight/flight/freeze responses firing off in the muscle tissue. Many of the symptoms that Trauma & PTSD sufferers face are caused by these types of build-ups. 

When done repeatedly, trauma releases exercises help release primitive ‘stressy’ build-ups from the body’s tissues and can have an absolutely profound impact on the symptoms of stress, trauma & PTSD. 

This approach to trauma release is supported and explained by two of the most popular books in the mental health space in recent years have been ‘The Body Keeps The Score’ by Bessel van der Kolk  & ‘Waking The Tiger’ by Peter Levine. These powerful manuscripts are an important part of the rising tide of awareness of the significance of trauma and adverse life events in determining our mental health.

Add to the sleep schedule a nighttime routine that triggers the brain into positive sleep thoughts and behaviours, like limiting screen use and ensuring your bedroom is tranquil and restful.

Furthermore, it tires you out, which in turn helps to increase your sleep drive. Regular exercise has been shown to enhance sleep quality; however, it is recommended to stop exercising at least three hours before bed to avoid sleep interference.

Healthy Eating

Healthy Eating

Behavioural symptoms

Stimulates

Mediation

Meditation

Nutrition and diet can impact the quality of your sleep, positively or negatively. Research studies have shown that deficiencies in calcium, selenium, potassium, magnesium, Vitamin D, Vitamin C, B6, Omega 3, 5HTP, and melatonin can cause sleep disturbances.

Reducing or removing anything from your diet that acts as a stimulant will support a reduction of your insomnia symptoms. If removal is difficult, look at limiting stimulates to earlier in the day.

Stress and anxiety can impact sleep patterns or, in severe cases, can trigger Insomnia. Meditation can help change the way your brain responds to these emotions. Mindfulness meditation, in particular, looks to improve sleep quality and reduce daytime disturbance in people with chronic Insomnia. There are numerous ways to learn meditation, via apps like Calm, YouTube videos or publications, but also via online or in-person classes.

So try adding herbal teas, almonds or walnuts, fatty fish, Cherries and Kiwi fruit into your diet. If you believe nutrients are a bigger factor in impacting your sleep, you can get blood tests completed that will highlight areas of deficiency.

Smoking – Cigarettes contain nicotine, which is a stimulant making it harder for smokers to fall asleep. They also tend to wake up more frequently and have a less deep sleep. 

Caffeine – Caffeine interferes with our circadian melatonin rhythms and blocks the body’s natural buildup of adenosine. Without the circadian melatonin rhythm, the onset of sleep is delayed.

Alcohol – As alcohol metabolites, it stimulates you, disrupting your REM sleep, which is important for mental focus, concentration, memory and learning. Try reducing or removing until your sleep is in a good rhythm.

Research has shown that meditation and mindfulness can help with a vast range of mental health challenges. Meditation classes are, in many ways, a preferable option when it comes to self-taught meditation, especially if you are trying to use meditation to help with an issue like depression. As is often the case, we can progress much quicker under guidance when learning new skills.

Acupuncture

Pain Management

Eye Movement Desensitisation and Reprocessing (EMDR)

Acupuncture

Person talking

Progressive Muscle Relaxation

Don’t put up with pain, especially if it’s impacting your sleep. There are many treatment options that will help get you out of pain, from the more traditional treatments like acupuncture, cupping, deep tissue, and chiropractic work to more modern treatments like shockwave and lasers.

Acupuncture is often used in traditional Chinese medicine for the treatment of Insomnia. Acupuncture involves extremely fine needles being inserted into the skin to stimulate specific points of the body.

Progressive Muscle Relaxation (PMR) aids the release of built-up stress from your muscles. PMR is a form of therapy that involves tightening and relaxing muscles, either engaging them in a precise pattern or individually.

Seeking a professional therapeutic health provider that can provide several pain treatment options will significantly increase your likelihood of success.

It is considered a drug-free, alternative treatment for several issues, including headaches, low back pain, knee pain and neck pain. Some recent studies have found acupuncture improves sleep quality, making it a fantastic alternative treatment option.

If practiced regularly, PMR can help manage stress’s physical effects on your body. Because PMR induces relaxation, it may also help you attain a better night’s sleep.

DeepWave delta brain waves deep sleep

Sleep Hypnosis

Psychedelic Assisted Therapy

Sleep Hypnosis is conducted by a licensed professional, e.g. a doctor, psychologist, or another health care worker. They will guide you to what may look like a trance-like state. Once you’re there, they will propose sleep-related changes that will work to change unfavourable thoughts or habits related to sleep.

Psychedelic-assisted therapy refers to therapeutic practices that involve the use of a class of currently widely prohibited substances known as psychedelics, like the cringingly named ‘magic mushrooms’ (psilocybin) and ‘Acid’ LSD.

These may include not being anxious about your sleep problems or practicing better sleep hygiene.

Few people are aware that before the wildly unscientific and entirely political decision to opt for psychedelic prohibition by the US Govt in 1973, there was a growing pool of high-quality research into their use therapeutically. All of which naturally came to a halt after prohibition kicked in. All this happened despite these substances having a toxicity profile that makes many over-the-counter medications look high risk. 

Thankfully since the early 1990s, a new generation of researchers has received permission to resuscitate psychedelic research. The results have been stunning. The trials have shown that the use of psychedelics like psilocybin in a carefully prescribed and monitored setting can induce an experience that is medically safe and that can lead to profound and lasting psychological and behavioural change in a statistically significant proportion of subjects. This research has been carried out in some of the world’s most respected medical research institutions (Johns Hopkins & Imperial College London). So the time has come for us to respectfully withdraw terms like ‘magic mushrooms’ and ‘drugs’ from the conversation about these desperately important natural therapeutic compounds. 

Interventions using psychedelics are showing promise as treatments for alcoholism, nicotine addiction, trauma & PTSD related to a terminal illness. New phases of the research are underway to examine the use of psychedelic-assisted therapy for obsessive-compulsive disorder, treatment-resistant depression and social anxiety. 

In a world facing an epidemic of mental health issues, there are few more promising areas of research than psychedelic-assisted therapies. While the mushrooms may not be magic, so far, the research results seemingly are.

Insomnia Treatments And Therapies

Mindfulness-Based Cognitive Therapy (MBCT)

Cognitive Behavioural Therapy for insomnia (CBT-i)

Cognitive behavioral therapy for insomnia is a structured program that helps you to overcome the underlying causes of your sleep problems. The programme allows you to identify and replace thoughts and behaviours that cause or worsen sleep problems with habits that promote sound sleep.

The cognitive part of CBT-I teaches you to recognise and change beliefs that affect your ability to sleep—helping you to control or eliminate negative thoughts and worries that keep you awake. The behavioral part of CBT-I helps you develop good sleep habits and avoid behaviors that keep you from sleeping well.

Depending on your needs, your sleep therapist may recommend some or a combination of these CBT-I techniques:

  • Stimulus control therapy 
  • Sleep restriction
  • Sleep hygiene
  • Sleep environment improvement
  • Relaxation training 
  • Remaining passively awake 
  • Biofeedback
Float Tanks

Float Tanks

Floating is a more recent addition to the wellness therapy landscape, becoming hugely popular in the past decade. Although float tanks won’t directly reduce Insomnia symptoms, they are known for supporting the reduction of stress and improving mental and emotional issues, which itself can prepare your body for a better night’s sleep. Float tanks are pods that act like sensory deprivation chambers, increasing your ability to relax and ‘switch off’. As the name suggests, you float, in body-temperature water, with low or no light.

Float tank therapy research shows promising results in reducing blood pressure and blood cortisol levels, improving recovery after sports and other physiological improvements. It’s also been shown to help manage anxiety symptoms and can even be useful in dealing with addiction. Shutting down the sensory input to the brain for an hour enables improvement in output and functionality. Simply put, it may be that floating is beneficial because we are so over-stimulated; and that just by resting our brains, it is able to perform better in ways that can even help mental health.

Brain chemistry

Brainwave Entrainment

Brainwave Entrainment is a form of light therapy that aims to reduce mental and emotional stress through changes in the frequency of brainwaves. In the same way that medication seeks to alter brain chemistry, brainwave entrainment seeks to alter brainwave activity.

When neurophysiology researchers scan the brains of Buddhist monks, they see consistently different brainwave patterns than they do when they scan the brain of stressed-out executives. This is because the brain is primarily an electric organ whose fundamental output can be measured in terms of its bioelectric output.

By stimulating brain cells with light that matches the frequency of happy, relaxed brain waves, entrainment aims to alter mood and mental function in people suffering from trauma & PTSD symptoms. Many trauma & PTSD  sufferers report dramatic alterations in their mood and mental function after even a handful of Brainwave Entrainment sessions. 

Brainwave Entrainment still sits very much on the margins of popular and well-known care options for trauma & PTSD  symptoms. In much the same way that EMDR Therapy did a short time ago. It should be interesting to see where Brainwave Entrainment research leads in years to come.

Trauma Release Exercises (TRE)

Trauma Release Exercises (TRE)

Trauma-release exercises tap into the body’s ability to release old stress responses from muscle tissue. This can sound a little strange until it’s explained properly. We are learning that much of our trauma and stress are actually stored in the body, as opposed to just the brain. This is where trauma and stress-release exercises come in.

Think of the way chronic stress can lead to a build-up of muscle tension over time. In the sense we often notice if we are receiving a shoulder massage. That tension actually builds up through countless unprocessed fight/flight/freeze responses firing off in the muscle tissue. Many of the symptoms that Trauma & PTSD sufferers face are caused by these types of build-ups. 

When done repeatedly, trauma releases exercises help release primitive ‘stressy’ build-ups from the body’s tissues and can have an absolutely profound impact on the symptoms of stress, trauma & PTSD. 

This approach to trauma release is supported and explained by two of the most popular books in the mental health space in recent years have been ‘The Body Keeps The Score’ by Bessel van der Kolk  & ‘Waking The Tiger’ by Peter Levine. These powerful manuscripts are an important part of the rising tide of awareness of the significance of trauma and adverse life events in determining our mental health.

Deepwave - OCD, Insomnia, sleep insomnia reading book

Sleep Schedule

A consistent sleep schedule helps to maintain the body’s internal clock or circadian rhythm. Creating a solid sleep schedule invites better quality rest, which then leads to better overall health. Ensure consistency, even at weekends, with the times you wake and head off to bed.

Add to the sleep schedule a nighttime routine that triggers the brain into positive sleep thoughts and behaviours, like limiting screen use and ensuring your bedroom is tranquil and restful.

Exercise

Exercise

Regular exercise can improve or deepen sleep in adults regardless of a sleep disorder. There are a few reasons why exercise can help; firstly, exercise is a wonderful way to reduce stress and anxiety levels through the release of endorphins. This aids in relaxing and minimizing the tossing and turning you might experience when you try to sleep.

Furthermore, it tires you out, which in turn helps to increase your sleep drive. Regular exercise has been shown to enhance sleep quality; however, it is recommended to stop exercising at least three hours before bed to avoid sleep interference.

Healthy Eating

Healthy Eating

Nutrition and diet can impact the quality of your sleep, positively or negatively. Research studies have shown that deficiencies in calcium, selenium, potassium, magnesium, Vitamin D, Vitamin C, B6, Omega 3, 5HTP, and melatonin can cause sleep disturbances.

So try adding herbal teas, almonds or walnuts, fatty fish, Cherries and Kiwi fruit into your diet. If you believe nutrients are a bigger factor in impacting your sleep, you can get blood tests completed that will highlight areas of deficiency.

Behavioural symptoms

Stimulates

Reducing or removing anything from your diet that acts as a stimulant will support a reduction of your insomnia symptoms. If removal is difficult, look at limiting stimulates to earlier in the day.

Smoking – Cigarettes contain nicotine, which is a stimulant making it harder for smokers to fall asleep. They also tend to wake up more frequently and have a less deep sleep. 

Caffeine – Caffeine interferes with our circadian melatonin rhythms and blocks the body’s natural buildup of adenosine. Without the circadian melatonin rhythm, the onset of sleep is delayed.

Alcohol – As alcohol metabolites, it stimulates you, disrupting your REM sleep, which is important for mental focus, concentration, memory and learning. Try reducing or removing until your sleep is in a good rhythm.

Mediation

Meditation

Stress and anxiety can impact sleep patterns or, in severe cases, can trigger Insomnia. Meditation can help change the way your brain responds to these emotions. Mindfulness meditation, in particular, looks to improve sleep quality and reduce daytime disturbance in people with chronic Insomnia. There are numerous ways to learn meditation, via apps like Calm, YouTube videos or publications, but also via online or in-person classes.

Research has shown that meditation and mindfulness can help with a vast range of mental health challenges. Meditation classes are, in many ways, a preferable option when it comes to self-taught meditation, especially if you are trying to use meditation to help with an issue like depression. As is often the case, we can progress much quicker under guidance when learning new skills.

Acupuncture

Pain Management

Don’t put up with pain, especially if it’s impacting your sleep. There are many treatment options that will help get you out of pain, from the more traditional treatments like acupuncture, cupping, deep tissue, and chiropractic work to more modern treatments like shockwave and lasers.

Seeking a professional therapeutic health provider that can provide several pain treatment options will significantly increase your likelihood of success.

Eye Movement Desensitisation and Reprocessing (EMDR)

Acupuncture

Acupuncture is often used in traditional Chinese medicine for the treatment of Insomnia. Acupuncture involves extremely fine needles being inserted into the skin to stimulate specific points of the body.

It is considered a drug-free, alternative treatment for several issues, including headaches, low back pain, knee pain and neck pain. Some recent studies have found acupuncture improves sleep quality, making it a fantastic alternative treatment option.

Person talking

Progressive Muscle Relaxation

Progressive Muscle Relaxation (PMR) aids the release of built-up stress from your muscles. PMR is a form of therapy that involves tightening and relaxing muscles, either engaging them in a precise pattern or individually.

If practiced regularly, PMR can help manage stress’s physical effects on your body. Because PMR induces relaxation, it may also help you attain a better night’s sleep.

DeepWave delta brain waves deep sleep

Sleep Hypnosis

Sleep Hypnosis is conducted by a licensed professional, e.g. a doctor, psychologist, or another health care worker. They will guide you to what may look like a trance-like state. Once you’re there, they will propose sleep-related changes that will work to change unfavourable thoughts or habits related to sleep.

These may include not being anxious about your sleep problems or practicing better sleep hygiene.

Psychedelic Assisted Therapy

Psychedelic-assisted therapy refers to therapeutic practices that involve the use of a class of currently widely prohibited substances known as psychedelics, like the cringingly named ‘magic mushrooms’ (psilocybin) and ‘Acid’ LSD.

Few people are aware that before the wildly unscientific and entirely political decision to opt for psychedelic prohibition by the US Govt in 1973, there was a growing pool of high-quality research into their use therapeutically. All of which naturally came to a halt after prohibition kicked in. All this happened despite these substances having a toxicity profile that makes many over-the-counter medications look high risk. 

Thankfully since the early 1990s, a new generation of researchers has received permission to resuscitate psychedelic research. The results have been stunning. The trials have shown that the use of psychedelics like psilocybin in a carefully prescribed and monitored setting can induce an experience that is medically safe and that can lead to profound and lasting psychological and behavioural change in a statistically significant proportion of subjects. This research has been carried out in some of the world’s most respected medical research institutions (Johns Hopkins & Imperial College London). So the time has come for us to respectfully withdraw terms like ‘magic mushrooms’ and ‘drugs’ from the conversation about these desperately important natural therapeutic compounds. 

Interventions using psychedelics are showing promise as treatments for alcoholism, nicotine addiction, trauma & PTSD related to a terminal illness. New phases of the research are underway to examine the use of psychedelic-assisted therapy for obsessive-compulsive disorder, treatment-resistant depression and social anxiety. 

In a world facing an epidemic of mental health issues, there are few more promising areas of research than psychedelic-assisted therapies. While the mushrooms may not be magic, so far, the research results seemingly are.

DeepWave Supports Successful Holistic Care Of

ANXIETY

TRAUMA

DEPRESSION

ADD & ADHD

PTSD

INSOMNIA

FIBROMYALGIA

MOOD DISORDERS

OCD

STRESS

CHRONIC PAIN

CHRONIC FATIGUE

DeepWave Supports Successful Holistic Care Of

FIBROMYALGIA

CHRONIC PAIN

DEPRESSION

ANXIETY

STRESS

OCD

PTSD

TRAUMA

INSOMNIA

ADD & ADHD

CHRONIC FATIGUE

MOOD DISORDERS

Insomnia Treatment Guidelines

Insomnia is a common sleep disorder that affects millions of people worldwide. Treatment for insomnia typically involves a combination of behavioural and medical interventions, but the most effective treatment approach can vary depending on the individual patient’s needs and underlying health conditions. Insomnia treatment guidelines provide evidence-based recommendations for healthcare providers on the most effective approaches to treating insomnia. 

These guidelines are designed to help healthcare providers develop a personalized treatment plan for their patients, taking into account factors such as the severity of insomnia, the patient’s medical history, and the potential risks and benefits of different treatment options. By following these guidelines, healthcare providers can help their patients achieve better sleep and improve their overall quality of life.

The following are some of the key recommendations that may be included in insomnia treatment guidelines:

Treatment Plan

Behavioural Therapies

Behavioral therapies, such as cognitive-behavioral therapy for insomnia (CBT-I), should be the first line of treatment for chronic insomnia.

Mindfulness-Based Cognitive Therapy (MBCT)

Combination Therapy

A combination of behavioural therapies and medication may be used in some cases, especially in the short-term treatment of severe insomnia.

Pharmacotherapy

Medications

Medications, such as sedatives, should be used judiciously and only for short-term treatment of insomnia. Long-term use of sedatives is associated with risks of dependency, tolerance, and other adverse effects.

Trauma Release Exercises (TRE)

Alternative Therapies

Alternative therapies, such as acupuncture or herbal remedies, may be considered for insomnia treatment, but the evidence supporting their effectiveness is limited.

DeepWave man with insomnia

Sleep hygiene

Basic sleep hygiene recommendations should be provided to all patients with insomnia, including advice on establishing regular sleep schedules, avoiding caffeine and alcohol, and creating a comfortable sleep environment.

Psychotherapy

Patient education

Healthcare providers should provide education to patients on the nature of insomnia, its causes, and the role of behavioral and pharmacological therapies in its treatment.

Psychotherapy

Follow-up

Healthcare providers should follow up with patients to assess treatment effectiveness, identify any adverse effects, and adjust treatment as needed.

Session Selection

What to expect - DeepWave - A lady sitting on a rock

Individual Session

A single session is perfect if you need a little mental relaxation during moments of heightened stress. Ideal to help combat the effects of, or prepare for a busy week.

DeepWave - What to expect A person meditating in the mountains

Course Of Sessions

We recommend a course of sessions if you are looking at supporting a specific outcome. A course typically lasts five or ten weeks, where one or two light sessions per week can be scheduled. 

This course protocol is then repeated every 2 to 3 months. Maintenance or relaxation sessions can be completed weekly or fortnightly during this more focused period; this is especially recommended if work or life stresses are significant.

Session Selection

Individual Session 

A single session is perfect if you need a little mental relaxation during moments of heightened stress. Ideal to help combat the effects of, or prepare for a busy week.

Course Of Sessions

We recommend a course of sessions if you are looking at supporting a specific outcome. A course typically lasts five or ten weeks, where one or two light sessions per week can be scheduled. 

This course protocol is then repeated every 2 to 3 months. Maintenance or relaxation sessions can be completed weekly or fortnightly during this more focused period; this is especially recommended if work or life stresses are significant.

Related Articles

Example DeepWave Sessions

Conscious Living

Conscious Living SMR

Length: 30 minutes

Delta Deep Dive

 Delta Deep Dive

Length: 30 minutes

No more insomnia

No More Insomnia

Length: 30 Minutes

Purpose: Emotional balance, focus & attention, elevated mood, improved sleep

Purpose: Deep relaxation, rejuvenation (Cerebral blood flow and HGH release)

Purpose:  Improved sleep, Calmness and Stress relief

Feeling: Chilled,Peaceful, Calming, Colourful

Feeling: Profoundly relaxing

Feeling: Chilled, Sleepy, Peaceful, Calming

Frequencies: 100% SMR (12-15Hz) with 85% at 14.4Hz

Frequencies: 80Hz, 7.83Hz, 2.5Hz, 1Hz

Frequencies: Theta and low Beta/SMR frequencies

This session uses solely frequencies in the SMR range. SMR stands for Sensory Motor Rhythm and is considered a fundamental balance frequency. Practice within this frequency range leads to a heightened ability to respond appropriately in changing situations. Almost like heart rate variability (HRV) for the brain. 

The result is improved concentration, focus, brain clarity, elevated mood, improved sleep patterns, and reduced stress. If there was such a thing as a magic bullet frequency, SMR would be in the running.

Delta Deep Dive is a profoundly relaxing session. The 30 minute session focuses the majority of its time within the delta brainwave states which is where recovery, rejuvenation and detoxing of the brain take place. Often when sleep is an issue like with insomnia, this is the level of brain activity that is most lacking.

Most people find it hard to stay alert while in this range of brainwaves but whether you relax deeply or fall asleep it does not matter, the benefit of getting more of this level of brain activity will show up in other ways like improved sleep and better recovery of both body and mind.

No More Insomnia is perfect for improving sleep, aiding calmness and supporting stress relief, it does this by increasing your SMR (Sensory Motor Rhythm) frequencies. SMR is your brains idling state where you are ready for either action or relaxation.

SMR frequencies have been shown to have some significant beneficial effects on calmness and quality of rest.

These frequencies are also responsible for movement, both while awake and non movement while asleep. 

This session is best used during the day rather than at night, which makes it perfect to add into your weekly sleep support routine

Example DeepWave Sessions

Conscious Living Mobile

Conscious Living SMR

Length: 30 Minutes

Purpose: Emotional balance, focus & attention, elevated mood, improved sleep

Feeling: Chilled, Peaceful, Calming, Colourful

Frequencies: 100% SMR (12-15Hz) with 85% at 14.4Hz

This session uses solely frequencies in the SMR range. SMR stands for Sensory Motor Rhythm and is considered a fundamental balance frequency. Practice within this frequency range leads to a heightened ability to respond appropriately in changing situations. Almost like heart rate variability (HRV) for the brain. 

The result is improved concentration, focus, brain clarity, elevated mood, improved sleep patterns, and reduced stress. If there was such a thing as a magic bullet frequency, SMR would be in the running.

Delta Deep Dive

Delta Deep Dive

Length: 30 Minutes

Purpose: Deep relaxation, rejuvenation (Cerebral blood flow and HGH release)

Feeling:  Profoundly relaxing

Frequencies: 80Hz, 7.83Hz, 2.5Hz, 1Hz

Delta Deep Dive is a profoundly relaxing session. The 30 minute session focuses the majority of its time within the delta brainwave states which is where recovery, rejuvenation and detoxing of the brain take place. Often when sleep is an issue like with insomnia, this is the level of brain activity that is most lacking.

Most people find it hard to stay alert while in this range of brainwaves but whether you relax deeply or fall asleep it does not matter, the benefit of getting more of this level of brain activity will show up in other ways like improved sleep and better recovery of both body and mind.

No more insomnia

No More Insomnia 

Length: 30 Minutes

Purpose: Improved sleep, Calmness and Stress relief

Feeling: Chilled, Sleepy, Peaceful, Calming

Frequencies:  Theta and low Beta/SMR frequencies

No More Insomnia is perfect for improving sleep, aiding calmness and supporting stress relief, it does this by increasing your SMR (Sensory Motor Rhythm) frequencies. SMR is your brains idling state where you are ready for either action or relaxation.

SMR frequencies have been shown to have some significant beneficial effects on calmness and quality of rest.

These frequencies are also responsible for movement, both while awake and non movement while asleep. 

This session is best used during the day rather than at night, which makes it perfect to add into your weekly sleep support routine